Introduction to Philosophy – term paper

The issue I want to explore in my term paper is whether or not truth to knowledge and epistemology is important. The concept of knowledge can be normally defined as justified true values and beliefs. The understanding of the concept is a critical element in the discipline of philosophy. However, knowledge could be different from truth because knowledge can be either false or true. Knowledge comprises of a set of beliefs and values, which is expected to be true by a certain person. What people refers to as knowledge in the society might be historically wrong or unacceptable. Research studies in epistemology often projects that it is not possible to know the actual truth (Benzmüller, & Paleo, 2014). Some of the reasons why epistemology suggests it tough to understand the real truth includes the skepticism of people and the philosophy of mind among others. Knowledge is usually very biased and subjective, but truth is usually defined by complete objectivity. Therefore, it is critical to learn the important of truth to knowledge and epistemology in the society.
A philosopher, Deloria stated that native Americans were keen on finding the moral and ethical value in which human beings should follow (Hester & Cheney, 2001). He determined that any knowledge is useful. Knowledge was in existent long before communities and individuals and thus, knowledge will also be truthful. The philosopher also explains that knowledge emerged from individual and communal experiences within the daily activities including the observations of the environment and relevant interpretation of societal messages and visions. From the native Indian perspective, any experiences were important to them. Every experience and aspect learned was integrated into their spectrum of knowledge.
Another philosophical aspect of postmodernism informs the modern epistemology specifically while it comes to understanding the truth. The postmodern models of truth are challenging to articulate in strict concepts as theorists tends to bring out difficult and fast definitions. Postmodernists have explained truth does not involve relationship outside the human understanding, which aligns with the relevant beliefs. They also believe that truth is formulated by what they believed effectively. From the abstract, truth is the reality. Following into the argument of Kant, postmodernists are not keen on understanding the truth, but focusing on their experiences. Every individual has different experience of the world, beliefs, and perspective of the world (Hester & Cheney, 2001). This aspect creates an individualized view of truth in the society. Some examples include that people do not rely on truth claims to make decisions. In most occasions, people will make decisions based on their knowledge and life experiences rather than the truth. The view of truths often requires deeper reflection and assessment of personal decisions and beliefs. Under such instances, the interpretation of the truths is impossible and people usually ends up using their experiences and knowledge.
However, it is not important to determine whether truth is knowledge. The two concepts are different and do not align effectively from a philosophical viewpoint. Knowledge involves the collection of information and experiences irrespective of whether they are true or untrue. Such argument depicts the limitations of supporting the statement of the importance of truth is knowledge. It is not appropriate to reflect on the truths as it does not support relevant knowledge input in the society.
The evaluation of the argument is important on whether the truth to knowledge is critical is both inductive and valid. The inductive aspect of the argument is that it is believed to be true based on the evidence. Many people believe that knowledge cannot necessarily be true as it is subjective. Validity of the argument is also clear due to the supporting evidence that supports truth element (Turri, 2016). The argument on the need for truth for knowledge is sound to define the philosophical assessment and understandings. The soundness of the truth to knowledge is relevant to improve the need for morality and ethics to improve truths in the society. The main argument on the significance of truth to knowledge is strong as it shapes the design for understanding of truth of information and knowledge. The formulation of truth to knowledge argument is strong in forming strong knowledge. The argument that it is important to learn the truth of knowledge is cogent as it clearly recommends the need to usefulness of truthful experience in the society. The clarity of the argument has attracted many philosophers to support truth rather than knowledge. It is because knowledge might be inaccurate based on a personal experiences and daily encounters.
In summary, the understanding of the concept of truth to knowledge is critical. The argument is sound, valid, cogent, and inductive because it seeks to understand the nature of truths as people make their decisions on a daily basis. Every individual has different experience of the world, beliefs, and perspective of the world. This aspect creates an individualized view of truth in the society. It is difficult to understand the real truth includes the skepticism of people and the philosophy of mind among others. Knowledge is usually very biased and subjective, but truth is usually defined by complete objectivity. Personally, I think that people should learn to appreciate truths as it based on evidence and information rather than knowledge. Knowledge might be subjective because it is build on personal experiences and ideas. Philosophers including Kant suggests that truths are not formed based on actual information, but the experiences of the people. Such definition of truth does not for good experience to obtaining quality knowledge.

References
Benzmüller, C., & Paleo, B. W. (2014, August). Automating Gödel’s Ontological Proof of God’s Existence with Higher-order Automated Theorem Provers. In ECAI (Vol. 263, pp. 93-98).
Hester, L., & Cheney, J. (2001). Truth and native American epistemology. Social Epistemology, 15(4), 319-334.
Turri, J. (2016). The radicalism of truth‐insensitive epistemology: Truth’s profound effect on the evaluation of belief. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, 93(2), 348-367.